Electrons and Positrons
As explained by Fredrik Nygaard, electrons are particles comprising 2 negative and 1 positive quanta arranged as negative-positive-negative and positrons are particles comprising 2 positive and 1 negative quanta arranged as positive-negative-positive.
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Electron
Positron
The previous explanation of the Electric Force provides the answer as to what makes them stick together. Here’s how it works: First considering the electron, the aether between a positive quantum and a negative quantum contracts, as described, and they move together until there is no space left between them and they touch. The same happens to a second negative quantum on the other side of the positive one. The result is a stable negative-positive-negative arrangement with a net unit negative charge. The same happens the other way around with the positron, producing a positive-negative- positive arrangement with a net unit positive charge. There will be a ‘reduced aether’ to either side of the central quantum in each case, where the lateral positive or negative i-neutrino field of the central quantum will be diminished by interaction with the fields of oppositely charge imprinted neutrinos on either side, but this lateral field does not influence the longitudinal bonding force. It does come into play, however, when we look at the formation of a proton. TThe electron is stable and has a net single negative charge while the net positive positron, although also stable, is short lived as it quickly encounters an electron, in abundant supply in all atoms, to transform back into a photon.
Protons & Neutrons
Range of the Electric Force
Electrons and Positrons
As explained by Fredrik Nygaard, electrons are particles comprising 2 negative and 1 positive quanta arranged as negative-positive-negative and positrons are particles comprising 2 positive and 1 negative quanta arranged as positive- negative-positive.
+
-
-
+
-
+
Electron
Positron
The previous explanation of the Electric Force provides the answer as to what makes them stick together. Here’s how it works: First considering the electron, the aether between a positive quantum and a negative quantum contracts, as described, and they move together until there is no space left between them and they touch. The same happens to a second negative quantum on the other side of the positive one. The result is a stable negative- positive-negative arrangement with a net unit negative charge. The same happens the other way around with the positron, producing a positive-negative- positive arrangement with a net unit positive charge. There will be a ‘reduced aether’ to either side of the central quantum in each case, where the lateral positive or negative i-neutrino field of the central quantum will be diminished by interaction with the fields of oppositely charge imprinted neutrinos on either side, but this lateral field does not influence the longitudinal bonding force. It does come into play, however, when we look at the formation of a proton. TThe electron is stable and has a net single negative charge while the net positive positron, although also stable, is short lived as it quickly encounters an electron, in abundant supply in all atoms, to transform back into a photon.
Protons & Neutrons
Range of the Electric Force
Electrons and Positrons
As explained by Fredrik Nygaard, electrons are particles comprising 2 negative and 1 positive quanta arranged as negative-positive-negative and positrons are particles comprising 2 positive and 1 negative quanta arranged as positive-negative-positive.
+
-
-
+
-
-
+
Electron
Positron
The previous explanation of the Electric Force provides the answer as to what makes them stick together. Here’s how it works: First considering the electron, the aether between a positive quantum and a negative quantum contracts, as described, and they move together until there is no space left between them and they touch. The same happens to a second negative quantum on the other side of the positive one. The result is a stable negative-positive-negative arrangement with a net unit negative charge. The same happens the other way around with the positron, producing a positive-negative-positive arrangement with a net unit positive charge. There will be a ‘reduced aether’ to either side of the central quantum in each case, where the lateral positive or negative i-neutrino field of the central quantum will be diminished by interaction with the fields of oppositely charge imprinted neutrinos on either side, but this lateral field does not influence the longitudinal bonding force. It does come into play, however, when we look at the formation of a proton. TThe electron is stable and has a net single negative charge while the net positive positron, although also stable, is short lived as it quickly encounters an electron, in abundant supply in all atoms, to transform back into a photon.
Protons & Neutrons
Range of the Electric Force