Neutron decay
Gravity
Creation of Matter
It is clear from the explanation of proton formation from electron-positron clusters in the Atoms section that a ‘free’ neutron will not be a stable arrangement. Without the stabilising orbiting outer electron and with the ‘extra’ electron left behind by the removed proton, the arrangement is returned to the size limit situation at which the bonds attracting the cluster’s positrons and electrons to each other become unsustainable. In this situation, a single random neutrino with sufficiently high charge imprint entering the small gap between the electron and the cluster is all that is required to trigger the previously described rejection of the electron and the process will be observed as a neutron decaying into a proton, an electron and a neutrino.
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Neutrino
Proton
Electron
Neutron
This explains what is observed to happen to a free neutron - it decays into a proton, an electron and a neutrino after about 15 minutes.
The electron involved here, attached to the outside of a proton, is starting from a higher energy state than that of an electron being ejected from within the cluster under the conditions that created the original proton. In this state, it needs only a small bump from the neutrino to detach it and send it flying off. Experimental evidence suggests that the bump it gets is sufficient for the electron to leave the scene completely, although, very rarely, it can go into orbit around the proton producing a hydrogen atom. In the more usual case where it does not, a stable proton will remain.
The long delay in decay time confirms that the bonds within protons here on Earth must, as expected, be stronger than when they were first ‘manufactured’ - strong enough that, even without the orbiting electron, the addition of a whole electron’s worth of charge to the outside of the proton cluster is now required to take it to the ‘tipping point’ at which the bonds became unsustainable. Which, of course, all makes perfect sense.
Neutron decay
Gravity
Creation of Matter
It is clear from the explanation of proton formation from electron-positron clusters in the Atoms section that a ‘free’ neutron will not be a stable arrangement. Without the stabilising orbiting outer electron and with the ‘extra’ electron left behind by the removed proton, the arrangement is returned to the size limit situation at which the bonds attracting the cluster’s positrons and electrons to each other become unsustainable. In this situation, a single random neutrino with sufficiently high charge imprint entering the small gap between the electron and the cluster is all that is required to trigger the previously described rejection of the electron and the process will be observed as a neutron decaying into a proton, an electron and a neutrino.
+
-
+
-
Neutrino
Proton
Electron
Neutron
This explains what is observed to happen to a free neutron - it decays into a proton, an electron and a neutrino after about 15 minutes.
The electron involved here, attached to the outside of a proton, is starting from a higher energy state than that of an electron being ejected from within the cluster under the conditions that created the original proton. In this state, it needs only a small bump from the neutrino to detach it and send it flying off. Experimental evidence suggests that the bump it gets is sufficient for the electron to leave the scene completely, although, very rarely, it can go into orbit around the proton producing a hydrogen atom. In the more usual case where it does not, a stable proton will remain.
The long delay in decay time confirms that the bonds within protons here on Earth must, as expected, be stronger than when they were first ‘manufactured’ - strong enough that, even without the orbiting electron, the addition of a whole electron’s worth of charge to the outside of the proton cluster is now required to take it to the ‘tipping point’ at which the bonds became unsustainable. Which, of course, all makes perfect sense.
Neutron decay
Gravity
Creation of Matter
It is clear from the explanation of proton formation from electron-positron clusters in the Atoms section that a ‘free’ neutron will not be a stable arrangement. Without the stabilising orbiting outer electron and with the ‘extra’ electron left behind by the removed proton, the arrangement is returned to the size limit situation at which the bonds attracting the cluster’s positrons and electrons to each other become unsustainable. In this situation, a single random neutrino with sufficiently high charge imprint entering the small gap between the electron and the cluster is all that is required to trigger the previously described rejection of the electron and the process will be observed as a neutron decaying into a proton, an electron and a neutrino.
+
-
+
-
Neutrino
Proton
Electron
Neutron
This explains what is observed to happen to a free neutron - it decays into a proton, an electron and a neutrino after about 15 minutes.
The electron involved here, attached to the outside of a proton, is starting from a higher energy state than that of an electron being ejected from within the cluster under the conditions that created the original proton. In this state, it needs only a small bump from the neutrino to detach it and send it flying off. Experimental evidence suggests that the bump it gets is sufficient for the electron to leave the scene completely, although, very rarely, it can go into orbit around the proton producing a hydrogen atom. In the more usual case where it does not, a stable proton will remain.
The long delay in decay time confirms that the bonds within protons here on Earth must, as expected, be stronger than when they were first ‘manufactured’ - strong enough that, even without the orbiting electron, the addition of a whole electron’s worth of charge to the outside of the proton cluster is now required to take it to the ‘tipping point’ at which the bonds became unsustainable. Which, of course, all makes perfect sense.