Our interpretation of the electric field offers an explanation as to how and why protons and neutrons stick together. Just as with the positron above, the aether between the negative electron and two positive protons contracts and they move together until there is no space left between them and so the electron is left sitting on the surface of, and in between, each proton. It is effectively stuck to the protons because, should it somehow manage to move away, the aether field in the gap would contract and it would be pulled back.
Protons and Neutrons
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The electron thus acts as a bond between the two protons providing the proton-electron-proton arrangement which conventionally is called a neutron plus a proton.
Atoms
Electrons & Positrons
Although a free proton is stable, a free neutron is not, as explained in the section on Neutron Decay.
A proton with an orbiting electron does not naturally combine with another to share one of their electrons and the above arrangement is one of the outcomes of the high energy electrical fields in which protons and matter are formed, as covered on the Proton Size and Stability page.
Our interpretation of the electric field offers an explanation as to how and why protons and neutrons stick together. Just as with the positron above, the aether between the negative electron and two positive protons contracts and they move together until there is no space left between them and so the electron is left sitting on the surface of, and in between, each proton. It is effectively stuck to the protons because, should it somehow manage to move away, the aether field in the gap would contract and it would be pulled back.
Protons and Neutrons
+
+
-
The electron thus acts as a bond between the two protons providing the proton-electron- proton arrangement which conventionally is called a neutron plus a proton.
Atoms
Electrons & Positrons
Although a free proton is stable, a free neutron is not, as explained in the section on Neutron Decay.
A proton with an orbiting electron does not naturally combine with another to share one of their electrons and the above arrangement is one of the outcomes of the high energy electrical fields in which protons and matter are formed, as covered on the Proton Size and Stability page.
Our interpretation of the electric field offers an explanation as to how and why protons and neutrons stick together. Just as with the positron above, the aether between the negative electron and two positive protons contracts and they move together until there is no space left between them and so the electron is left sitting on the surface of, and in between, each proton. It is effectively stuck to the protons because, should it somehow manage to move away, the aether field in the gap would contract and it would be pulled back.
Protons and Neutrons
+
+
-
The electron thus acts as a bond between the two protons providing the proton-electron-proton arrangement which conventionally is called a neutron plus a proton.
Atoms
Electrons & Positrons
Although a free proton is stable, a free neutron is not, as explained in the section on Neutron Decay.
A proton with an orbiting electron does not naturally combine with another to share one of their electrons and the above arrangement is one of the outcomes of the high energy electrical fields in which protons and matter are formed, as covered on the Proton Size and Stability page.