Static Charge 3
We earlier considered the static charge induced in a non-conductor by the charge from a conductor. This can, of course, also happen in reverse.
Structure of the Neutrino
Static Charge 2 - Friction
If a large insulating body which has been given a static charge is brought close to a small uncharged conducting body then the charge imprinted neutrino field around the insulator will interact with the atomic or molecular dipoles of the conductor. For a large conductor, this would have little or no effect because any local charge difference would be immediately spread through the entire body. However, for a sufficiently small and electrically isolated conducting body, this equalisation is not possible and the body itself becomes polarised.
It’s commonly considered that positive and negative charges cancel each other out. They don’t.
The local opposite charge i-neutrino fields between the two bodies now interact to produce smaller zero point and low charge imprint neutrinos and so the aether between the two shrinks, giving us attraction.
Exactly the same happens at the ‘macro’ level with static charge. Once two oppositely charged insulators are in contact, they stay in contact. The opposite charges on their surfaces are not cancelled out. A statically charged balloon stuck to the ceiling can be removed and then ‘stuck’ back up. The charges were not cancelled out.
Opposite charges don’t cancel each other out
Of course, in the real or practical world, static attraction diminishes over time as a result of, say, surface charge conduction (antistatic sprays work by coating surfaces with a conducting film) or the conduction of charge through ionised particles in the air. Which is why a balloon never seems to stay stuck to the ceiling for quite as long as we’d like!
Positive and negative charges live perfectly happily in contact with each other, as we have seen with the bonding between the positive and negative quanta of positrons and electrons, the bonding between positrons and electrons to create protons and the bonding of positive protons and electrons in atomic nuclei. The charges are unchanged, all that has changed is the neutrino field between them. When the i-neutrino fields interact to produce zero point or lower charge imprint neutrinos, the aether shrinks and the bodies move together.
Static Charge 3
We earlier considered the static charge induced in a non-conductor by the charge from a conductor. This can, of course, also happen in reverse.
Structure of the Neutrino
Static Charge 2 - Friction
If a large insulating body which has been given a static charge is brought close to a small uncharged conducting body then the charge imprinted neutrino field around the insulator will interact with the atomic or molecular dipoles of the conductor. For a large conductor, this would have little or no effect because any local charge difference would be immediately spread through the entire body. However, for a sufficiently small and electrically isolated conducting body, this equalisation is not possible and the body itself becomes polarised.
It’s commonly considered that positive and negative charges cancel each other out. They don’t.
The local opposite charge i-neutrino fields between the two bodies now interact to produce smaller zero point and low charge imprint neutrinos and so the aether between the two shrinks, giving us attraction.
Opposite charges don’t cancel each other out
Positive and negative charges live perfectly happily in contact with each other, as we have seen with the bonding between the positive and negative quanta of positrons and electrons, the bonding between positrons and electrons to create protons and the bonding of positive protons and electrons in atomic nuclei. The charges are unchanged, all that has changed is the neutrino field between them. When the i- neutrino fields interact to produce zero point or lower charge imprint neutrinos, the aether shrinks and the bodies move together.
Exactly the same happens at the ‘macro’ level with static charge. Once two oppositely charged insulators are in contact, they stay in contact. The opposite charges on their surfaces are not cancelled out. A statically charged balloon stuck to the ceiling can be removed and then ‘stuck’ back up. The charges were not cancelled out.
Of course, in the real or practical world, static attraction diminishes over time as a result of, say, surface charge conduction (antistatic sprays work by coating surfaces with a conducting film) or the conduction of charge through ionised particles in the air. Which is why a balloon never seems to stay stuck to the ceiling for quite as long as we’d like!
Static Charge 3
We earlier considered the static charge induced in a non- conductor by the charge from a conductor. This can, of course, also happen in reverse.
Structure of the Neutrino
Static Charge 2 - Friction
If a large insulating body which has been given a static charge is brought close to a small uncharged conducting body then the charge imprinted neutrino field around the insulator will interact with the atomic or molecular dipoles of the conductor. For a large conductor, this would have little or no effect because any local charge difference would be immediately spread through the entire body. However, for a sufficiently small and electrically isolated conducting body, this equalisation is not possible and the body itself becomes polarised.
It’s commonly considered that positive and negative charges cancel each other out. They don’t.
The local opposite charge i-neutrino fields between the two bodies now interact to produce smaller zero point and low charge imprint neutrinos and so the aether between the two shrinks, giving us attraction.
Opposite charges don’t cancel each other out
Positive and negative charges live perfectly happily in contact with each other, as we have seen with the bonding between the positive and negative quanta of positrons and electrons, the bonding between positrons and electrons to create protons and the bonding of positive protons and electrons in atomic nuclei. The charges are unchanged, all that has changed is the neutrino field between them. When the i-neutrino fields interact to produce zero point or lower charge imprint neutrinos, the aether shrinks and the bodies move together.
Exactly the same happens at the ‘macro’ level with static charge. Once two oppositely charged insulators are in contact, they stay in contact. The opposite charges on their surfaces are not cancelled out. A statically charged balloon stuck to the ceiling can be removed and then ‘stuck’ back up. The charges were not cancelled out.
Of course, in the real or practical world, static attraction diminishes over time as a result of, say, surface charge conduction (antistatic sprays work by coating surfaces with a conducting film) or the conduction of charge through ionised particles in the air. Which is why a balloon never seems to stay stuck to the ceiling for quite as long as we’d like!