Static Charge 3
Static charge
Static Charge 2 - Friction
The situation is an equilibrium in which the electrostatic field between them comprises a local field of i-neutrinos around the surface of one body, a local field of opposite charge i-neutrinos around the other body and an intervening field of zero point and low charge i-neutrinos between the two.
If the wider body continues to be moved sideways, the charge on the other’s surface will continue to increase. Eventually, the charge differential between the two bodies will reach a point where the dielectric material between the two surfaces breaks down and there will be a relieving transfer of charge (a spark) between the two bodies.
So, with the ‘friction’ of ongoing movement between the two, then, in the illustration above, the larger (moving) body will cause a charge build up on the smaller (stationary) one. The better the insulating (non-conducting) properties of either or both bodies, the greater the effect.
Two uncharged insulating (non-conducting) bodies placed near to each other will have no force between them - other than gravity. There will be no induced dipoles at either of their surfaces and so no electrostatic field.
However, should one of them have a surface charge, however small, then dipoles will be induced in the other body. Since electrical fields naturally exist everywhere on Earth, this will generally be the situation.
As explained on the previous page, if two insulating bodies are brought close together, the small (natural) surface charge on one will induce dipoles in the other and there will be some attraction between them. However, unless the charge is sufficiently large, then for stationary nearby bodies of similar size, nothing very interesting happens.
In most everyday experiences of the electrostatic force, such as, say, rubbing a balloon on a synthetic fabric and sticking it to the ceiling or the usually undesirable sparking that many of us have experienced when touching a metal door handle after walking across a nylon carpet, it is the smaller body which is rubbed against the larger. In the example of the high voltages generated by electrostatic generators such as the Wimshurst influence machine, it is the other way around.
However, if one of the bodies is wider and is moved to one side, a fresh supply of i-neutrinos is introduced into the field. This immediately induces more dipoles, or a stronger dipole alignment, or both, in the other body which in turn increases the electrostatic force of attraction between them. As the body continues to move and more negative i-neutrinos are introduced, more dipoles are induced in the other body’s surface and the field becomes stronger.
Static Charge 3
Static charge
Static Charge 2 - Friction
The situation is an equilibrium in which the electrostatic field between them comprises a local field of i-neutrinos around the surface of one body, a local field of opposite charge i-neutrinos around the other body and an intervening field of zero point and low charge i-neutrinos between the two.
If the wider body continues to be moved sideways, the charge on the other’s surface will continue to increase. Eventually, the charge differential between the two bodies will reach a point where the dielectric material between the two surfaces breaks down and there will be a relieving transfer of charge (a spark) between the two bodies.
So, with the ‘friction’ of ongoing movement between the two, then, in the illustration above, the larger (moving) body will cause a charge build up on the smaller (stationary) one. The better the insulating (non-conducting) properties of either or both bodies, the greater the effect.
Two uncharged insulating (non-conducting) bodies placed near to each other will have no force between them - other than gravity. There will be no induced dipoles at either of their surfaces and so no electrostatic field.
However, should one of them have a surface charge, however small, then dipoles will be induced in the other body. Since electrical fields naturally exist everywhere on Earth, this will generally be the situation.
As explained on the previous page, if two insulating bodies are brought close together, the small (natural) surface charge on one will induce dipoles in the other and there will be some attraction between them. However, unless the charge is sufficiently large, then for stationary nearby bodies of similar size, nothing very interesting happens.
In most everyday experiences of the electrostatic force, such as, say, rubbing a balloon on a synthetic fabric and sticking it to the ceiling or the usually undesirable sparking that many of us have experienced when touching a metal door handle after walking across a nylon carpet, it is the smaller body which is rubbed against the larger. In the example of the high voltages generated by electrostatic generators such as the Wimshurst influence machine, it is the other way around.
However, if one of the bodies is wider and is moved to one side, a fresh supply of i-neutrinos is introduced into the field. This immediately induces more dipoles, or a stronger dipole alignment, or both, in the other body which in turn increases the electrostatic force of attraction between them. As the body continues to move and more negative i-neutrinos are introduced, more dipoles are induced in the other body’s surface and the field becomes stronger.
Static Charge 3
Static charge
Static Charge 2 - Friction
The situation is an equilibrium in which the electrostatic field between them comprises a local field of i-neutrinos around the surface of one body, a local field of opposite charge i- neutrinos around the other body and an intervening field of zero point and low charge i-neutrinos between the two.
If the wider body continues to be moved sideways, the charge on the other’s surface will continue to increase. Eventually, the charge differential between the two bodies will reach a point where the dielectric material between the two surfaces breaks down and there will be a relieving transfer of charge (a spark) between the two bodies.
So, with the ‘friction’ of ongoing movement between the two, then, in the illustration above, the larger (moving) body will cause a charge build up on the smaller (stationary) one. The better the insulating (non-conducting) properties of either or both bodies, the greater the effect.
Two uncharged insulating (non-conducting) bodies placed near to each other will have no force between them - other than gravity. There will be no induced dipoles at either of their surfaces and so no electrostatic field.
However, should one of them have a surface charge, however small, then dipoles will be induced in the other body. Since electrical fields naturally exist everywhere on Earth, this will generally be the situation.
As explained on the previous page, if two insulating bodies are brought close together, the small (natural) surface charge on one will induce dipoles in the other and there will be some attraction between them. However, unless the charge is sufficiently large, then for stationary nearby bodies of similar size, nothing very interesting happens.
In most everyday experiences of the electrostatic force, such as, say, rubbing a balloon on a synthetic fabric and sticking it to the ceiling or the usually undesirable sparking that many of us have experienced when touching a metal door handle after walking across a nylon carpet, it is the smaller body which is rubbed against the larger. In the example of the high voltages generated by electrostatic generators such as the Wimshurst influence machine, it is the other way around.
However, if one of the bodies is wider and is moved to one side, a fresh supply of i-neutrinos is introduced into the field. This immediately induces more dipoles, or a stronger dipole alignment, or both, in the other body which in turn increases the electrostatic force of attraction between them. As the body continues to move and more negative i-neutrinos are introduced, more dipoles are induced in the other body’s surface and the field becomes stronger.