Static Charge
All bodies comprise countless atoms made of protons and electrons arranged into molecules which in turn form, to a greater or lesser extent, electrical dipoles. Under the influence of an external electric field, these dipoles will try to align in the direction of the field.
Static charge 2 - Friction
Dipoles
If there is a nearby body with, say, a negative charge, then the surface of a non-conducting body (insulator) will have its dipoles aligned in such a way that it gives the surface a small positive charge. The surface neutrino field of the insulator will therefore be rich in positive i-neutrinos which, upon encountering the nearby body’s negative i-neutrino field, will have their charge imprints reduced or cancelled out and so, as explained in the Electric Force, they will shrink in size. The local aether contracts and the two bodies are pulled together.
In the above illustration, the lower body is shown as a negatively charged conducting material. If it is ‘switched off’ and so becomes electrically neutral, there will be no electrostatic effect and the only attraction between the two bodies would be that of gravity.
Opposite charge i-neutrinos ‘cancel’ to zero-point
+
-
-
+
Local field rich in positive i-neutrinos
aether shrinks
Local field of negative i-neutrinos
If the lower body, instead of being a conductor, is an insulator which has been given a static charge, then we get the same attractive force - an example of which is a statically charged balloon stuck to an (uncharged) ceiling. Tellingly, the tiny area of contact between balloon and ceiling still provides an electrical force field that easily overcomes the gravitational force of the entire planet pulling downwards on the balloon.
Two insulators
Insulator and Conductor
If the nearby body had a positive charge instead of a negative charge, then exactly the same happens except the signs of the charges are reversed. In this case the surface neutrino field of the insulator would be rich in negative i-neutrinos and the two bodies are again pulled together. Static electricity always results in attraction.
Static Charge
All bodies comprise countless atoms made of protons and electrons arranged into molecules which in turn form, to a greater or lesser extent, electrical dipoles. Under the influence of an external electric field, these dipoles will try to align in the direction of the field.
Static charge 2 - Friction
Dipoles
If there is a nearby body with, say, a negative charge, then the surface of a non-conducting body (insulator) will have its dipoles aligned in such a way that it gives the surface a small positive charge. The surface neutrino field of the insulator will therefore be rich in positive i- neutrinos which, upon encountering the nearby body’s negative i-neutrino field, will have their charge imprints reduced or cancelled out and so, as explained in the Electric Force, they will shrink in size. The local aether contracts and the two bodies are pulled together.
In the above illustration, the lower body is shown as a negatively charged conducting material. If it is ‘switched off’ and so becomes electrically neutral, there will be no electrostatic effect and the only attraction between the two bodies would be that of gravity.
Local field rich in positively charged neutrinos
Opposite charge i-neutrinos ‘cancel’ to zero-point
Local field rich in positive i-neutrinos
aether shrinks
+ - - +
Local field of negative i- neutrinos
Insulator and Conductor
If the lower body, instead of being a conductor, is an insulator which has been given a static charge, then we get the same attractive force - an example of which is a statically charged balloon stuck to an (uncharged) ceiling. Tellingly, the tiny area of contact between balloon and ceiling still provides an electrical force field that easily overcomes the gravitational force of the entire planet pulling downwards on the balloon.
Two insulators
If the nearby body had a positive charge instead of a negative charge, then exactly the same happens except the signs of the charges are reversed. In this case the surface neutrino field of the insulator would be rich in negative i- neutrinos and the two bodies are again pulled together. Static electricity always results in attraction.
Static Charge
All bodies comprise countless atoms made of protons and electrons arranged into molecules which in turn form, to a greater or lesser extent, electrical dipoles. Under the influence of an external electric field, these dipoles will try to align in the direction of the field.
Static charge 2 - Friction
Dipoles
If there is a nearby body with, say, a negative charge, then the surface of a non-conducting body (insulator) will have its dipoles aligned in such a way that it gives the surface a small positive charge. The surface neutrino field of the insulator will therefore be rich in positive i-neutrinos which, upon encountering the nearby body’s negative i-neutrino field, will have their charge imprints reduced or cancelled out and so, as explained in the Electric Force, they will shrink in size. The local aether contracts and the two bodies are pulled together.
In the above illustration, the lower body is shown as a negatively charged conducting material. If it is ‘switched off’ and so becomes electrically neutral, there will be no electrostatic effect and the only attraction between the two bodies would be that of gravity.
Opposite charge i-neutrinos ‘cancel’ to zero-point
+
-
-
+
Local field rich in positive i-neutrinos
aether shrinks
Local field of negative i- neutrinos
Insulator and Conductor
If the lower body, instead of being a conductor, is an insulator which has been given a static charge, then we get the same attractive force - an example of which is a statically charged balloon stuck to an (uncharged) ceiling. Tellingly, the tiny area of contact between balloon and ceiling still provides an electrical force field that easily overcomes the gravitational force of the entire planet pulling downwards on the balloon.
Two insulators
If the nearby body had a positive charge instead of a negative charge, then exactly the same happens except the signs of the charges are reversed. In this case the surface neutrino field of the insulator would be rich in negative i-neutrinos and the two bodies are again pulled together. Static electricity always results in attraction.