Conclusion
Static Charge 3
Structure of the Neutrino
All the foregoing is based on the premise that there are three fundamental particles of which one is the neutral quantum, or neutrino. However, the term ‘fundamental’ may need to be reviewed. Establishment physics uses the term, along with ‘elementary’ to describe such particles, of which, at time of writing, there are at least 12 if we don’t count the 13 bosons, see Occam’s Razor. However, we may find that we have to review what we mean by ‘fundamental’ or ‘indivisible’. Just like the concept of small fleas on the backs of large fleas and even smaller fleas on the backs of those, we don’t know just how small things can get!
Because one of the neutrino’s properties is a memory, the ability to take on an imprint of the ‘fundamental’ charge when it contacts another charged body, it is highly likely that the neutrino has structure. If it were indeed a composite of multiple smaller positives and negatives then we have a path to follow to be able to explain this property. We might then also get to understand why the acquisition of a positive or negative imprint within the structure causes it to grow in size.
When the charge on two plates is increased, we get a corresponding ‘smooth’ increase in electric force rather than in jumps, which tells us that the i-neutrino cannot exist in just a few ‘quantum’ charge imprint states. This again suggests structure.
Also, unless the universe is gradually filling up with very low energy i-neutrinos (which I seriously doubt!) there must be a minimum charge imprint level at which they revert to ‘zero point’. Low charge i-neutrinos colliding with zero point neutrinos will result in two i-neutrinos with the mean charge imprint shared equally and, in this fashion, the level of imprint decreases with every collision. At some point (and very rapidly) it must decrease to a ‘minimum threshold’ imprint in one or both and therefore, at or before that point is reached, the i-neutrino must assume a zero charge imprint state through its own structural mechanisms and properties or through interaction with other particles, possibly photons.
Conclusion
Static Charge 3
Structure of the Neutrino
All the foregoing is based on the premise that there are three fundamental particles of which one is the neutral quantum, or neutrino. However, the term ‘fundamental’ may need to be reviewed. Establishment physics uses the term, along with ‘elementary’ to describe such particles, of which, at time of writing, there are at least 12 if we don’t count the 13 bosons, see Occam’s Razor. However, we may find that we have to review what we mean by ‘fundamental’ or ‘indivisible’. Just like the concept of small fleas on the backs of large fleas and even smaller fleas on the backs of those, we don’t know just how small things can get!
Because one of the neutrino’s properties is a memory, the ability to take on an imprint of the ‘fundamental’ charge when it contacts another charged body, it is highly likely that the neutrino has structure. If it were indeed a composite of multiple smaller positives and negatives then we have a path to follow to be able to explain this property. We might then also get to understand why the acquisition of a positive or negative imprint within the structure causes it to grow in size.
When the charge on two plates is increased, we get a corresponding ‘smooth’ increase in electric force rather than in jumps, which tells us that the i-neutrino cannot exist in just a few ‘quantum’ charge imprint states. This again suggests structure.
Also, unless the universe is gradually filling up with very low energy i-neutrinos (which I seriously doubt!) there must be a minimum charge imprint level at which they revert to ‘zero point’. Low charge i-neutrinos colliding with zero point neutrinos will result in two i-neutrinos with the mean charge imprint shared equally and, in this fashion, the level of imprint decreases with every collision. At some point (and very rapidly) it must decrease to a ‘minimum threshold’ imprint in one or both and therefore, at or before that point is reached, the i-neutrino must assume a zero charge imprint state through its own structural mechanisms and properties or through interaction with other particles, possibly photons.
Conclusion
Static Charge 3
Structure of the Neutrino
All the foregoing is based on the premise that there are three fundamental particles of which one is the neutral quantum, or neutrino. However, the term ‘fundamental’ may need to be reviewed. Establishment physics uses the term, along with ‘elementary’ to describe such particles, of which, at time of writing, there are at least 12 if we don’t count the 13 bosons, see Occam’s Razor. However, we may find that we have to review what we mean by ‘fundamental’ or ‘indivisible’. Just like the concept of small fleas on the backs of large fleas and even smaller fleas on the backs of those, we don’t know just how small things can get!
Because one of the neutrino’s properties is a memory, the ability to take on an imprint of the ‘fundamental’ charge when it contacts another charged body, it is highly likely that the neutrino has structure. If it were indeed a composite of multiple smaller positives and negatives then we have a path to follow to be able to explain this property. We might then also get to understand why the acquisition of a positive or negative imprint within the structure causes it to grow in size.
When the charge on two plates is increased, we get a corresponding ‘smooth’ increase in electric force rather than in jumps, which tells us that the i-neutrino cannot exist in just a few ‘quantum’ charge imprint states. This again suggests structure.
Also, unless the universe is gradually filling up with very low energy i-neutrinos (which I seriously doubt!) there must be a minimum charge imprint level at which they revert to ‘zero point’. Low charge i-neutrinos colliding with zero point neutrinos will result in two i-neutrinos with the mean charge imprint shared equally and, in this fashion, the level of imprint decreases with every collision. At some point (and very rapidly) it must decrease to a ‘minimum threshold’ imprint in one or both and therefore, at or before that point is reached, the i-neutrino must assume a zero charge imprint state through its own structural mechanisms and properties or through interaction with other particles, possibly photons.